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Aurora Snow’s Once Upon A Time: Season 3: Ep. 14: “The Tower” Review

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“The Tower”

 **Spoiler Alert**

This week’s episode of Once Upon a Time could just have easily been called “A Father’s Fear.” It’s all about Charming in this episode with some endearing scenes as he explores and faces his fears. Having a baby can be an amazing and terrifying time in a new parent’s life. And while Charming isn’t a new parent, he may just as well be since he missed out on Emma’s childhood.

Even in the flashbacks David never got around to facing his fear, but he was able to help Rapunzel face her’s. Following Robin Hood’s advice about using a substance to summon his courage, David goes off in search of nightroot. He can’t face his fear on his own and is willing to risk the consequences of ingesting a magical root. (Isn’t drinking liquor a simpler solution?) He never gets the chance, just as he’s digging up nightroot he hears a damsel in distress. Enter Rapunzel. Why she called for help is unclear. Maybe she was bored. After all what else does a Princess sitting in a tower do?

A witch trapped Rapunzel in the tower shortly after she ingested nightroot. Big surprise, the witch isn’t real, it’s Rapunzel; it’s her fear personified. That’s what the magical nightroot does, it creates evil doppelgangers. Apparently, you must face your fear or be killed by it. Rapunzel finally faced hers and runs home to her parents to rule her kingdom (happily ever after). I doubt we’ll see much more of her in OUAT. She did a great job, but felt like a one time character.

David has no memories of his encounter with Rapunzel so when he faces his own personification of fear he can’t connect it to nightroot. Too bad. If only he suspected the new midwife slipped something extra in his tea then they’d all know who the witch was. Seeing Emma’s little yellow bug drive up gave David the courage he needed to face his own fears. Bravo. By doing so all of his courage was transferred to the sword he used to conquer his own demon. Which was the Wicked Witch’s plan all along. She now has David’s courage. If this were Oz, he’d be the Cowardly Lion. If I had to speculate I’d peg Regina for the Tin Man (she’s the one that will need a heart), maybe Hook for the Scarecrow which would make Emma the group’s Dorothy. The irony of discovering a farm house with a storm cellar is not lost on Emma either.

I still find Zelena’s proximity to Snow White’s bulging belly disconcerting. I suspect Zelena has ulterior motives for being Snow’s midwife and none of them can be good. I found the scene between Snow and Zelena a bit contrived. Before David arrives for tea, the two women sat awkwardly at the table swapping stories in character. Chemistry between the two is obviously lacking. Good thing they don’t have many scenes together!

Zelena has Rumple in the palm of her hand, literally — she has his dagger! She basically tells Rumple that she has daddy issues. Her papa was a terrible drunk and she’s never forgotten it. His hands shook too much from the alcohol abuse, so as a young girl she had to do his shaving for him. Zelena shares this with Rumple as she shaves him with the dagger in a touchingly creepy scene. Hmm…who fathered the Wicked Witch?

Rumple later escapes, or so we are led to believe. But how far can he really go when Zelena holds his dagger? Looking forward to seeing more of Rumple in future episodes. He’s been sorely missed. I’m also curious to see just how far into OZ the show will go. Are there munchkins in our future or just more flying monkeys?

This wasn’t the strongest episode of the season, but had some entertaining points. I was disappointed with Rapunzel, her one dimensional character fell flat. I think the writers should have given her more to work with.

Aurora Snow Says

Episode Rating:

[Rating:3/5]

iTunes

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