9.5 C
New York
Saturday, November 28, 2020
Advertisement

Bad Company: Live at Wembley Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080i/60
  • Audio Codec: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, LPCM 2.0 Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1
  • Subtitles: English, French, German, Spanish
  • Region: ABC (Region-Free)
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Discs: 1
  • Studio: Eagle Rock
  • Blu-ray Release Date: June 28, 2011
  • List Price: $19.98

[amazon-product]B0050JN814[/amazon-product]

Purchase Bad Company: Live at Wembley on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:4/5]
The Performance
[Rating:5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:1/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(Screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG  thus are meant as a general representation of the content and do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Performance

[Rating:5/5]

One of the original super-groups, Bad Company exploded onto the rock scene in 1973 made up of members from Free (vocalist Paul Rodgers and drummer Simon Kirke), Mott The Hoople (guitarist Mick Ralphs) and King Crimson (original bassist Boz Burrell who died in 2006). The band would rack up a string of hits for nearly a decade, staying together for 9 years, before disbanding in 1983. There was a reunion 4 years later without Rodgers, before the band got together again in 1999 with Rodgers once more at the front, but that was short-lived. Finally, in 2008, all the remaining original members came together again, and fans couldn’t be more thrilled. There was an anthology and 3 original tracks released, plus the Hard Rock Live concert release.

In 2010, the and was back at it and in April, 2010, they performed at London’s Wembley Arena in to a packed crowd. That performance is captured here on this new Eagle Rock release from Eagle Rock, Bad Company: Live at Wembley.

From the opening riffs of “Can’t Get Enough,” it’s almost like the decades have fallen away and Bad Co are back in the halcyon days of the 1970s when they were burning up the charts. Augmented by Lynn Sorensen and guitarist Howard Leese, Bad Company tear through 16 tracks of riff-laden hard rock. Obvious crowd favorites like “Feel Like Makin’ Love,” “Shooting Star,” and “Bad Company” are spattered around lesser-known, but equally energetic numbers like “Burnin’ Sky” and “Run with the Pack.” Paul Rodgers voice is in top form during this performance as well. Unlike some of his contemporaries, this guy sounds like he hasn’t aged a day. Great stuff for fans of big, bluesy hard rock of the 70s.

Track Listing:

  1. Can’t Get Enough
  2. Honey Child
  3. Run With The Pack
  4. Burnin’ Sky
  5. Young Blood
  6. Seagull
  7. Gone, Gone, Gone
  8. Electric Land
  9. Simple Man
  10. Feel Like Makin’ Love
  11. Shooting Star
  12. Rock And Roll Fantasy
  13. Movin’ On
  14. Ready For Love
  15. Bad Company
  16. Deal With The Preacher

Video Quality

[Rating:4/5]

Video is a high definition 1080i/60 AVC/MPEG-4 encodement. As far a live performance captures go, this isn’t the most difficult showI have seen, despite the flashing lights behind the band and constant quick edits and cutaways. Still, I feel picture quality could have been just a little sharper and contained a little less noise, but it is solid for a live concert event nonetheless. There are good foreground details and lifelike flesh tones.

Audio Quality

[Rating:4.5/5]

The sound is pretty evenly matched across all three formats presented on this release, so whether you select the DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, LPCM 2.0 Stereo, or Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, you’re getting high quality sound. Both the lossless DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 and LPCM 2.0 options offer wide stereo panning, extended, but tight and musical low frequencies, with clean, upfront vocals and good instrumental separation. Obviously, the surround option opens things up a bit and this one seems to do a better job than most of adding in ambience in the surounds to help expand the soundfield and create a more “live” sound while also almost pushing the guitars off to the sides rather than from left/right front. The Dolby Digital 5.1 mix is nearly identical in tonality and dynamics, as far as I could tell, to the DTS-HD MA, only the high frequencies sounded a little less natural and more crispy to my ears.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:1/5]

There’s little here outside of an interview segment with the band (1.78:1; 1080i/60; 0:19.49) although the thin booklet does contain a few cool concert stills and glowing, but brief liner note by Jeb Wright of ClassicRockRevisited.com.

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:4/5]

Geezer rock? Man, this stuff sounds every bit as vibrant and energetic today as it once did long ago. Get it. Got it? Good.

Additional Screen Captures

[amazon-product]B0050JN814[/amazon-product]

Purchase Bad Company: Live at Wembley on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:4/5]
The Performance
[Rating:5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:1/5]

Join the Discussion on Our Forum

Advertisement

Related Articles

The Lord of the Rings: The Motion Picture Trilogy (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

A stunning 4K Ultra HD restoration of The Lord of the Rings Trilogy arrives.

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Blu-ray Review)

An excellent entry (or farewell?) for this beloved franchise with lots of action and great animation.

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Stay Connected

301FansLike
0FollowersFollow
723FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

Notice of Compliance with FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 255

In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR part 255 guidelines, this website hereby states that it receives free discs and other theatrical or home entertainment “screeners” and access to screening links from studios and/or PR firms, and is provided with consumer electronics devices on loan from hardware manufacturers and/or PR firms respectively for the purposes of evaluating the products and its content for editorial reviews. We receive no compensation from these companies for our opinions or for the writing of reviews or editorials.
Permission is sometimes granted to companies to quote our work and editorial reviews free of charge. Our website may contain affiliate marketing links, which means we may get paid commission on sales of those products or the services we write about. Our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Latest Articles

The Lord of the Rings: The Motion Picture Trilogy (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

A stunning 4K Ultra HD restoration of The Lord of the Rings Trilogy arrives.

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Blu-ray Review)

An excellent entry (or farewell?) for this beloved franchise with lots of action and great animation.

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.
%d bloggers like this: