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Hard Core Logo/Hard Core Logo 2 Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080i/60 (29.976Hz) (Hard Core Logo); 1080p/24 (23.976Hz) (Hard Core Logo 2)
  • Audio Codec: English Dolby Digital 5.1
  • Subtitles: English SDH
  • Region: A (Region-Locked)
  • Rating: NR
  • Discs: 1 (1 x Blu-ray )
  • Digital Copies: N/A
  • Run Time: 92 Mins.
  • Studio: Video Service Corp.
  • Blu-ray Release Date: November 20, 2012
  • List Price: $29.98

Overall
[Rating:3.5/5]
The Film
[Rating:3.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:2.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:2.5/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(All TheaterByte screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG at 100% quality setting and are meant as a general representation of the content. They do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Film

[Rating:3.5/5]

In the tradition of rock and roll mockumentaries such as This is Spinal Tap, Canadian filmmaker Bruce McDonald created this cult gem, in the mid-1990s, Hard Core Logo. The film is about a formerly successful punk band of the same name reunited in the early-90s and led by enigmatic frontman Joe Dick (Hugh Dillon), ostensibly for an anti-gun benefit after his hero Bucky Haight (Julian Richings) survives a shooting. The supposed documentary follows the band on their trouble-filled tour of Western Canada as the troubles of the rock and roll lifestyle inevitably creep in and lead to major dysfunction, once again, amongst the bandmembers. The film is famous for a number of things, including its dark humor, realistic portrayal of the hardcore punk scene, and (brief) cameo appearances as themselves by real punk legends Joey Ramone, Art Bergmann, and Joey Shithead. Also of note is the shocking conclusion that finds Joe Dick taking his own life on camera after a shambles of a tour.

Less successful is the film’s sequel, Hard Core Logo 2, available on this disc as well, which claims to follow female grunge/punk rocker, Care Failure (think Courtney Love or Babes in Toyland), who claims to be channeling the ghost of Joe Dick. In this mockumentary, McDonald, who inserts himself into the narrative, is meant to investigate whether Care Failure’s claims at being a medium for the late Joe Dick are true, at the urgings of an acquaintance who happens to be a Wiccan witch. Sometimes it’s better not to go back to the same well twice, because the water may be tainted. Hard Core Logo was only a reasonably entertaining film, Hard Core Logo 2 is instantly forgettable and regrettable.

Video Quality

[Rating:3.5/5]

We don’t exactly get spectacular high definition reference quality material with either of these films, but considering the style of the material at hand. Hard Core Logo comes with a 1080i/60 AVC encodement that often looks quite rough, but is about as clean as can be. Hard Core Logo 2, shot mainly on a Cannon 7D in HD, but also utilizing some of the same 16mm footage from the original film, sometimes looks a bit better, but it still tends to look a bit soft and suffers form digital artifacts. It’s provided in a 1080p/24 AVC/MPEG-4 encodement.

Audio Quality

[Rating:2.5/5]

Only lossy Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtracks are provided for both films. This does no justice for the hard rock musical soundtrack, making everything sound somewhat shrill and the ambience tight and artificial, but as far as this guerrilla style of mockumentary is concerned, it fits.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:2.5/5]

This “SteelBook” packaged disc is loaded with interviews and comedic featurettes that continue on in the style of each of the films. Additionally each film has its own filmmaker commentary.

The supplements:

Hardcore Logo:

  • Audio Commentary with director Bruce McDonald, actor Hugh Dillon and screenwriter Noel Baker
  • Hard Core Logo “Who the Hell Do You Think You Are?” Music Video (1.33:1; SD; 00:02:20)
  • Excerpt from the book Bruce McDonald’s “Hard Core Logo” by Paul McEwan
  • Original Theatrical Trailer (1.33:1; SD)

Hard Core Logo 2:

  • Audio Commentary featuring director Bruce McDonald and Simon Less
  • Hard Core Logo 2 Featurette (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:18:49)
  • Original Theatrical Trailer (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:01:52)
  • Director Bruce McDonald Interview (1.78:1; 1080i/60; 00:17:39)
  • Producer Rob Merilees Interview (1.78:1; 1080i/60; 00:04:49)
  • Care Failure Interview (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:04:12)
  • Actor Julian Richings Interview (1.78:1; 1080i/60; 00:06:55)

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:3.5/5]

The comedy in Hard Core Logo (one or two) might not reach the level of absurdity that it does in a film like This is Spinal Tap, it has a much darker undertone and seeks to really make you think it is reality you are watching, but it does manage to make you believe it. It’s a wild ride on the dark side of rock and roll. The sequel is too far fetched and silly to even be considered in the same class as the first film.

Additional Screen Captures

[amazon-product]B0091UCB5W[/amazon-product]

Purchase Hard Core Logo 1 & 2 on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

[amazon-product]B0091UCB5W[/amazon-product]

Purchase Hard Core Logo 1 & 2 on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:3.5/5]
The Film
[Rating:3.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:2.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:2.5/5]


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