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Karate-Robo Zaborgar Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080p/24 (23.976Hz)
  • Audio Codec: Japanese DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (48kHz/16-bit), Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles Color: White
  • Region: ABC (Region-Free)
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Discs: 1 (1 x Blu-ray )
  • Digital Copies: N/A
  • Run Time: 114 Mins.
  • Studio: Well Go USA
  • Blu-ray Release Date: September 11, 2012
  • List Price: $24.98

Overall
[Rating:3/5]
The Film
[Rating:2.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:1.5/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(All TheaterByte screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG at 100% quality setting and are meant as a general representation of the content. They do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Film

[Rating:2.5/5]

The creative team responsible for Mutant Girls Squad, director/writer Noboru Iguchi and special effects director Yoshihiro Nishimura, reunite to create this immeasurably cheesy homage to the 52-episode 1970s Japanese television series Karate-Robo Zaborgar. An absurd sci-fi action comedy, it follows an orphaned martial arts expert named Daimon (Itsuji Itao) who, along with his Robot/motorcycle friend Zaborgar, fights a criminal organization named Sigma that has been kidnapping Japan’s top leaders and stealing their DNA to make a super-weapon. Split into two parts, part one follows Daimon in his early years as he battles Sigma and falls in love with their female cyborg, Ms. Borg. Part two takes place 25-years later and Daimon must battle Sigma’s new super-weapon that threatens to destroy Japan. The film plays out almost like a live-action anime, with over-the-top acting and a non-linear storyline that is rather difficult to follow, but it will be a real boon to fans of classic Japanese monster and mecha films.

Video Quality

[Rating:4/5]

Karate-Robo Zaborgar was captured in high definition and looks basically good, if not particularly cinematic in this AVC/MPEG-4 1080p encodement from Well Go USA. There is more a natural, life-like appearance to the imagery and colors, which look quite vibrant. Some areas occasionally show slight video noise and black levels aren’t as inky as I’d like to see them, but otherwise this is a solid transfer.

Audio Quality

[Rating:4.5/5]

The Japanese DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 (48kHz/16-bit) soundtrack more than gets the job done with clear dialogue and active discrete panning across the surround channels during the multitudinous action sequences. To help out with explosions, kicks, and punches there are deep, extended low frequencies that really rattle the floorboards.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:1.5/5]

There’s not much here, but more of the weird, wild and whacky world of Zaborgar in the Short Films.

  • Go, Zaborgar Go! Short Films (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:18:59)
  • More Sushi Typhoon Trailers

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:3/5]

Only the Japanese could come up with something as wonderfully zany as Karate-Robo Zaborgar,but it will definitely appeal to only a certain sort of viewer, so I recommend renting this before purchase, unless you are an established fan of this genre.

Additional Screen Captures

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Purchase Karate-Robo Zaborgar on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

[amazon-product]B008FIPN8I[/amazon-product]

Purchase Karate-Robo Zaborgar on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:3/5]
The Film
[Rating:2.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:1.5/5]

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