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Lady and the Tramp: Diamond Edition Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 2.55:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080p/24 (23.976Hz)
  • Audio Codec: English DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 (48kHz/24-bit), English DTS-HD Master Audio 3.0 Stereo: Restored Original Soundtrack (48kHz/24-bit), French, and Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1
  • Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish
  • Region: ABC (Region-Free)
  • Rating: G
  • Run Time: 76 Mins.
  • Discs: 2 (1 x Blu-ray + 1 x DVD)
  • Studio: Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment
  • Blu-ray Release Date: February 7, 2012
  • List Price: $39.99

[amazon-product]B0061QD82E[/amazon-product]

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Lady & The Tramp - Widescreen Subtitle

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Overall
[Rating:4.5/5]
The Film
[Rating:4.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:4/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(All TheaterByte screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG at 100% quality setting and are meant as a general representation of the content. They do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Film

[Rating:4.5/5]

According to Walt Disney’s daughter, Diane Miller, Walt was a dog lover through and through. He really wanted to capture in film the characteristics of his beloved canines. He finally would with Lady and the Tramp, a film that was under development as Walt was also busy building his fantasy theme park Disneyland. Being one of the few films from the era by the studio not based on a work of classic literature or folklore, Lady and the Tramp is a true Disney original and a charmingly sweet romance at that. The story is of a sheltered uptown cocker spaniel named Lady (Barbara Luddy) who is raised by two loving humans until the time they have a child of their own and suddenly the climate in their home changes. When Lady is muzzled, she runs away and meets a downtown stray mutt who calls himself Tramp (Larry Roberts). Lady decides to spend time with Tramp, and Tramp shows her the ropes of living a free life on the streets and a budding romance develops between the two, but Tramp’s freewheeling lifestyle will later catch up to him getting Lady into far more trouble than she ever experienced in her sheltered life.

Told strictly from the perspective of the dogs, Lady and the Tramp superbly captures the motions and features of each breed of dog while the musical numbers such as “Bella Notte” are seamlessly interwoven into the story in a sensible manner.

I haven’t taken any polls to be able to rank where exactly Lady and the Tramp ranks in Disney’s canon of classic animated features, but I know enough to know that it is one of the studio’s most beloved films. Who doesn’t have a vivid memory of Lady and Tramp slurping up their spaghetti and meatballs while “Bella Notte” swells in the background? It is one of the most enduring movie moments in cinematic history, of which Disney has created many.

Video Quality

[Rating:5/5]

Lady and the Tramp arrives in the glorious Disney widescreen aspect ratio of 2.55:1 in yet another magnificent restoration from the studio that truly knows how to deliver masterful classic animation on Blu-ray. The AVC/MPEG-4 1080p/24 encodement is clean and detailed with shimmering color and no artifacts in sight. There’s a strong sense of dimensionality that can be seen in the characters against the backgrounds. This is wonderful eye candy.

Audio Quality

[Rating:4.5/5]

Kudos to Disney for finally providing both a brand new 7.1 mix and the original restored audio mix in a lossless codec. The original audio mix comes in a 3.0 Stereo configuration. It will be one that anyone around in the 1950s or familiar with the Living Stereo series of classical releases (currently available on SACD) will know about. It is the original form of stereo reproduction and uses three channels across the front rather than two with a “phantom” center. This mix, in DTS-HD Master Audio 3.0, sounds really good, with wide panning and distinct imagery. It may just be a tad bit dull, but that is most likely due to its age and the recording equipment. It is clean with dynamics that are decent if just a bit narrow.

The DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix mostly mirrors the original 3.0 mix, only making it more ambient and fuller in sound through tasteful use of the LFE and slightly wider dynamics. There isn’t really any discrete use of the surround or back channels, making the 7.1 mix seem a bit like overkill.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:4/5]

The Diamond Edition Blu-ray of Lady and the Tramp is loaded with new extras and extras ported over from the previous DVD edition. Mostly they are made up of deleted scenes and storyboards, plus a classic “making of” featurette. The disc is also Second Screen enabled for use with Disney’s Second Screen iPad App, allowing additional interactive features to be accessed during playback of the disc.

The supplements:

  • Introduction by Diane Miller (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:01:21)
  • Audio Commentary – Inside Walt’s Story Meetings
  • Second Screen Enabled Featuring “Inside Walt’s Story Meetings”
  • Backstage Disney: Diamond Edition:
    • Diane Miller: Remembering Dad (1.78:1; 1080p/24; 00:07:51) – Walt Disney’s daughter offers memories of her parents’ home and the building of Disneyland.
    • Deleted Scenes (1.78:1; 1080p/24) – These rough sketches are shown with narration and sound effects:
      • Introduction of Boris
      • Waiting for Baby
      • Dog Show
  • Music & More:
    • Never Recorded Song: “I’m Free as the Breeze,” lyrics by Ray Gilbert and Music by Eliot Daniel
  • Classic DVD Bonus Features:
    • Lady’s Pedigree: The Making of Lady and the Tramp
    • Finding Lady: The Art of the Storyboard
    • Original 1943 Storyboard Version of the Film
    • “The Siamese Cat Song”: Finding a Voice for the Cats
    • PuppyPedia: Going to the Dogs
    • “Bella Notte” Music Video
    • Theatrical Trailers:
      • 1955 Original Theatrical Trailer
      • 1972 Theatrical Reissue
      • 1986 Reissue
    • Excerpts from “Disneyland” TV Shows:
      • Introduction
      • The Story of Dogs (Excerpt)
      • Promo Trailer for “The Story of Dogs”
      • Cavalcade of Song (Excerpt)
    • Deleted Scenes:
      • Introduction
      • Turning the Tables
      • Introduction
      • The Arrival of Baby
  • Discover Blu-ray 3D with Timon & Pumbaa
  • DVD — Standard DVD of the Lady and the Tramp: Diamond Edition

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:4.5/5]

Yet another must-have restoration of a Disney animated classic appears on Blu-ray. This is reference quality, eye candy with a heartwarming story and compelling extras in tow. If you are a Disney fan or an animation fan, then the Lady and the Tramp: Diamond Edition Blu-ray release should be at the top of your “buy” list.

Additional Screen Captures

[amazon-product]B0061QD82E[/amazon-product]

BestBuy.com
Lady & The Tramp - Widescreen Subtitle

Also available:

Purchase Lady and the Tramp: Diamond Edition on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for More Blu-ray Titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:4.5/5]
The Film
[Rating:4.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:4/5]

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