8.1 C
New York
Wednesday, November 25, 2020
Advertisement

Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen — Complete Collection (TheaterByte Blu-ray Review)

rozen-maiden-zurukspulen-cc-blu-ray-3d-skew-post-insertRozen Maiden (ローゼンメイデン ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Peach-Pit. This anime series, Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen is actually the fourth series based on this manga series, following Rozen Maiden, Rozen Maiden: Träumend, and Rozen Maiden: Ouvertüre respectively. I enter this franchise from this fourth series, which is also animated for the first time by Studio Deen. The Gothic fantasy series is a bit of a time warping series that follows the story of seven sentient porcelain dolls created by someone named Rozen who implanted them with a mystical crystal named the “Rosa Mystica” then sent them off into the world to find masters and to battle against each other. The object of this grand battle, known as “The Alice Game” is for the dolls to steal the “Rosa Mystica” from each other. When one doll has obtained all seven Rosa Mystica, then she can return to Rozen to become the perfect singular doll known as “Alice.”

In Zurükspulen one of these dolls, Shinku, appears in the life of a young middle shooler Sakurada Jun who, due to an illness, is staying out of school. Shinku is delivered to him in a box along with a letter asking if he will wind or not wind, and when he opens it and turns a key to wind her up, she comes alive, thereby drawing him into the Alice game when he accepts her rings and becomes her master. He soon finds himself sharing his home with a number of these dolls who are destined to battle each other to the death, even Shinku’s main rival, the raven-winged Suigintou.

Years later in an alternate reality, Jun receives the Shinku doll, but makes the opposite decision, to not wind. Then this alternate Jun’s life is disrupted when he begins receiving text messages from his younger self asking for help. Can one reality’s choices have an effect on the other?

I cannot comment on how true this series is to the Rozen Maiden franchise on the whole, but I can say that is seems to generally follow the norms of the Gothic genre in anime, other than the idea of living dolls drawing a boy into their interdimensional battle royale seems rather unique. The biggest asset of the production is definitely the resplendence of the character designs, however. The details sketched out in the dresses are eye popping, for sure. Shinku’s scarlet dress is the standout, but all the dolls looked beautiful and meticulously ornamented.

As for the story, there could have been some more fleshing out of the characters and a bit more work put into explaining the different planes of existence where the story takes place. Unless you really zone in, you are likely to miss what is going on and have to go back to figure out what’s what. There are also a couple of characters crucial to the resolution that don’t make much of an appearance until the end, making for what feels like a very rushed or heavily weighted finale to these episodes.

The Video

Sentai Filmworks offers up Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen in an AVC 1080p encodement on Blu-ray that looks generally clean and sharply detailed. The primary colors pop nicely, especially the scarlet dress that Shinku wears. There is some noticeable banding in some of the fills, but it doesn’t do great harm to the overall pleasing look of this series on Blu-ray.

The Audio

The original Japanese-language track and the English dub are included in DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 stereo mixes. The sound is excellent given it is only stereo – it is very atmospheric, has a wide stereo image, and good dynamic range. My preference remains with the Japanese cast who add a real sense of mystery to their performances, but the English cast are decent, just not as moving.

The Supplements

Only the clean opening animation and clean closing animation plus Sentai Filmworks trailers are included.

The Final Assessment

This series has excellent atmosphere and beautiful imagery and the idea of sentient porcelain dolls is in itself quite spooky. I’ve been in a doll collector’s house, and those things are definitely the stuff of nightmares. That said, Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen is only an average series. Not terrible, but not fantastic either.

Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen — Complete Collection (TheaterByte Blu-ray Review)
3 / 5 TheaterByte Rating
{{ reviewsOverall }} / 5 User Rating (0 votes)
Studio Deen/Sentai FilmworksStudios & Distributors
Hatakeyama MamoruDirector
Mochizuki TomomiWriter
325 Mins.Run Time
$69.98MSRP
20 Sep. 2016Release Date
1.78:1Aspect Ratio
AVC 1080pVideo
Japanese DTS-HD MA 2.0 StereoAudio
TV-14 (V)TV Rating
English DTS-HD MA 2.0 StereoSecondary Audio
The Creative Content
The Video
The Audio
The Supplements
Summary
Rozen Maiden: Zurükspulen is visually appealing and has all the right atmosphere for a Gothic fantasy series, but it is hindered by a somewhat confused plot and underuse of some key characters.
What people say... Login to rate
Order by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

This review has no replies yet.

Avatar
Show more
Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}

Advertisement

Related Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Stay Connected

300FansLike
0FollowersFollow
723FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

Notice of Compliance with FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 255

In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR part 255 guidelines, this website hereby states that it receives free discs and other theatrical or home entertainment “screeners” and access to screening links from studios and/or PR firms, and is provided with consumer electronics devices on loan from hardware manufacturers and/or PR firms respectively for the purposes of evaluating the products and its content for editorial reviews. We receive no compensation from these companies for our opinions or for the writing of reviews or editorials.
Permission is sometimes granted to companies to quote our work and editorial reviews free of charge. Our website may contain affiliate marketing links, which means we may get paid commission on sales of those products or the services we write about. Our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Latest Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

The Irishman (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Martin Scorsese's Academy Award-nominated (Best Director) late career crime world epic gets the Criterion Collection treatment it deserves.

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Criterion gives us a brilliant new 4K restoration on Blu-ray of Jim Jarmusch's 1999's indie classic about a loner assassin who follows the way of the samurai.
%d bloggers like this: