8.1 C
New York
Wednesday, November 25, 2020
Advertisement

The King’s Speech Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080p/24
  • Audio Codec: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
  • Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish
  • Region: A (Region-Locked)
  • Rating: R
  • Discs: 1
  • Studio: The Weinstein Company/Anchor Bay Entertainment
  • Blu-ray Release Date: April 19, 2011
  • List Price: $39.99

[amazon-product align=”right”]B003UESJHE[/amazon-product]

BestBuy.com:
The King's Speech -

Purchase The King’s Speech on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:4/5]
The Film
[Rating:4.5/5]

Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]

Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]

Supplemental Materials
[Rating:3.5/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(Screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG  thus are meant as a general representation of the content and do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Film

[Rating:4.5/5]

A film about personal struggle remarkable both for its spectacular performances from Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush and its ability to make one feel sympathetic toward one of the most privileged men history has ever known, The King’s Speech is worthy of all its accolades, including all four of those Oscars it scooped up this year.

Firth plays Albert, Duke of York, and second in line to the British throne. He is a shy quiet family man happy to keep in the shadow of his older brother Edward. It’s the dawn of the radio age and the world is on the brink of war with Hitler threatening to rampage across Europe.

Albert’s father, King George V in a bid to toughen him up has burdened his son with public speaking and radio addresses, despite his terrible speech impediment – he’s been a life-long stammerer. It hasn’t helped his public profile, but it’s all been fine since he has only needed to be in the wings his entire life.

Meanwhile, his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) has been quietly trying to help her husband find help through an endless procession of speech therapists with their own brand of seemingly inane solutions, before stumbling upon the failed Australian actor turned speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush) who seems to have the winning solution.

Logue’s stubborn stance that in his office he and all his clients are equals, including the Duke of York, brings out the subtle class distinctions hinted at in the film, but also allows for an interesting look into the psyche of the Duke. Albert, finally feeling at ease after a few sessions, blurts out a spate of curse words, revealing the pent up anger and other secrets from childhood that may be at the root of his stuttering, deepening this unlikely friendship.

When their father, the king, dies, the family is thrown into turmoil, as Edward is unable to fulfill his duties as King due to his ongoing love affair with the married American divorcee Mrs. Simpson, and abdicates the throne for his love. Albert is then thrust into the limelight and upon the throne of Britain, eventually having to give the most important speech of his entire life, an address to the entire British empire before heading into the Second World War.

Tom Hooper’s direction is impeccable, spanning years and various story lines with ease, while the acting of Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush is of the highest standard. Their chemistry together makes watching The King’s Speech an absolute pleasure.

Video Quality

[Rating:4/5]

The King’s Speech is clean, as one one would expect a film of recent vintage to be, and shows good detail and color reproduction. There is strong shadow detail, but black levels are a little washed out in dark scenes and grain levels are definitely heavy in darker areas as well.

Audio Quality

[Rating:3.5/5]

The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 soundtrack is front-heavy, as to be expected in this sort of film. The surround channels offer only some mild atmospheric sound effects. There was at least one moments when a discrete sound effect of a plane flying overhead was panned from back to front, which seemed awkward and out of place given the subtle nature of the rest of the mix.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:3.5/5]

Of particular interest here will be the actual speeches of King George VI and an interview with the grandson of Lionel Logue.

The supplements provided with this release are:

  • Feature Commentary with Director Tom Hooper
  • The King’s Speech: An Inspirational Story of an Unlikely Friendship (1.78:1; 480i/60; 0:23.01)
  • Q&A with the Director & The Cast (1.78:1; 1080i/60; 0:22.02) – A live Q&A with the main cast as director.
  • Speeches from the Real King George VI:
    • Pre-War Speech – Radio Broadcast September 3, 1939 (As Seen at the End of the Film)
    • Post-War Speech Filmed on Newsreel May 14, 1945
  • The Real Lionel Logue (1.78:1; 480i/60; 0:10.34) – Interview with Mark Logue, Lionel Logue’s grandson and co-author of The King’s Speech: How One Man Saved the British Monarchy.
  • The Stuttering Foundation (Public Service Announcement) (1.33:1; 480i/60)

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:4/5]

Profoundly well acted and moving on a personal level, The King’s Speech is the quintessential British costume drama. Tom Hooper manages to weave the different threads of time and lineage together in an understandable way, making the film all the more enjoyable.

Additional Screen Captures

[amazon-product align=”right”]B003UESJHE[/amazon-product]

BestBuy.com:
The King's Speech -

Purchase The King’s Speech on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:4/5]
The Film
[Rating:4.5/5]

Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]

Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]

Supplemental Materials
[Rating:3.5/5]

Join the Discussion on Our Forum

Advertisement

Related Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Stay Connected

300FansLike
0FollowersFollow
722FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

Notice of Compliance with FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 255

In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR part 255 guidelines, this website hereby states that it receives free discs and other theatrical or home entertainment “screeners” and access to screening links from studios and/or PR firms, and is provided with consumer electronics devices on loan from hardware manufacturers and/or PR firms respectively for the purposes of evaluating the products and its content for editorial reviews. We receive no compensation from these companies for our opinions or for the writing of reviews or editorials.
Permission is sometimes granted to companies to quote our work and editorial reviews free of charge. Our website may contain affiliate marketing links, which means we may get paid commission on sales of those products or the services we write about. Our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Latest Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

The Irishman (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Martin Scorsese's Academy Award-nominated (Best Director) late career crime world epic gets the Criterion Collection treatment it deserves.

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Criterion gives us a brilliant new 4K restoration on Blu-ray of Jim Jarmusch's 1999's indie classic about a loner assassin who follows the way of the samurai.
%d bloggers like this: