6.6 C
New York
Tuesday, November 24, 2020
Advertisement

Verdi: Stiffelio [Teatro Regio di Parma] Blu-ray Review

verdi-stiffelio-tetro-regio-di-parma-blu-ray-cover

  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080i/60
  • Audio Codec: PCM 2.0; DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio  
  • Subtitles: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean
  • Region: ABC (Region-Free)
  • Running Time: 127 minutes
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Discs: 1 (1 x Blu-ray)
  • Studio: C Major
  • Blu-ray Release Date: March 26, 2013
  • List Price: $39.99

Overall
[Rating:3.5/5]
The Performance
[Rating:3.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:2/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(The below TheaterByte screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG at 100% quality setting and are meant as a general representation of the content. They do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

 

The Performance

[Rating:3.5/5]

title

Somewhere in the middle of Verdi’s white-heat decade of creativity (1842-1853), Stiffelio has gotten lost in the shuffle of such masterpieces as Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, and La Traviata. This opera has taken on the difficult themes, particularly for the 19th century, of infidelity and adultery. As part of the Tutto Verdi series, the Teatro Regio di Parma has given us this 2012 performance with a relatively young and not well known cast.

Stiffelio, a Protestant minister (tenor Roberto Aronica) and his wife Lina (soprano Yu Quanqun) are visiting Lina’s father, Stankar (baritone Roberto Frontali) who suspects that his daughter is having an affair. Stiffelio’s suspicions point to the nobleman Raffaele (tenor Gabriele Mangione). Eventually, the guilty Lina is discovered by her husband and her father.  Stankar is driven to avenge this affront to family honor and does murder Raffaele. In a display of true Christian values, Stiffelio identifies his wife in front of his congregation and then publicly forgives her transgression.

This domestic drama, a genre in which Verdi’s creative genius excelled, succeeds or fails on the basis of the credibility of the relationships between the principal characters. Far from being a “cavalcade of stars,” this story of ordinary individuals caught up in highly charged circumstances needs a sense of ensemble. Fortunately, this is what we get mostly from the assembled cast with sympathetic direction from its young maestro, Andrea Battistoni who leads a spirited performance.

Video Quality

[Rating:4/5]

duo

In spite of the rather bare stage, director Tiziano Mancini works another visual miracle, giving us the illusion that there is more than what meets the eye. Note the biblical text that covers the stage’s floor. The costumes are, as might be expected, rather drab fundamentalist wardrobe, the exception being Raffaele’s colorful dress.  Details are good and what colors are present are accurately conveyed.

Audio Quality

[Rating:3.5/5]

church

Voices and orchestra are balanced in favor of the latter, giving us a mid-orchestra perspective. The surround track is more atmospheric than the two-channel alternative.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:2/5]

coro2

I am thankful to the Tutto Verdi project for giving us a 10-minute feature with each performance that includes a visual synopsis as well as background material for this less well known Verdi work. The serviceable booklet also gives us a synopsis and more background material. Trailers for other operas in this series are included.

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:3.5/5]

pray2

While frequently billed as a tenor vehicle, and we have DVDs with Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras in the title role, this opera shows Verdi’s transition to works in which all of the principals are coequals. Tenor Aronica will not erase my memories of either of the two above-mentioned iconic artists but he makes a good case for this rather non-heroic role. I was most impressed with Chinese soprano Guanqun who has graced the Metropolitan Opera stage in this season’s Il Trovatore as Leonora. Her intense performance, laced with great musicianship, is enough reason alone to acquire this BD. Baritone Frontali is also a genuine article Verdian who makes the most of a role reminiscent of other Verdi fathers (Germont, Rigoletto, Amonasro, Boccanegra). None of this would matter if we did not get strong direction from the pit, and here we get a prodigy in the making in Andrea Battistoni, a definite talent to watch. Stiffelio might not be everyman’s Verdi but this production will be a good introduction to an unduly neglected opera.

Additional Screen Captures

[amazon-product region=”uk” tracking_id=”bluraydefinit-21″]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

[amazon-product region=”ca” tracking_id=”bluraydefinit-20″]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

[amazon-product]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

Purchase Verdi: Stiffelio on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

stank

coro

duo2

stage

pray

[amazon-product region=”uk” tracking_id=”bluraydefinit-21″]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

[amazon-product region=”ca” tracking_id=”bluraydefinit-20″]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

[amazon-product]B0094AH39I[/amazon-product]

Purchase Verdi: Stiffelio on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:3.5/5]
The Film
[Rating:3.5/5]
Video Quality
[Rating:4.5/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:2/5]

Facebooktwitter

Advertisement

Related Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Stay Connected

300FansLike
0FollowersFollow
0FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

Notice of Compliance with FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 255

In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR part 255 guidelines, this website hereby states that it receives free discs and other theatrical or home entertainment “screeners” and access to screening links from studios and/or PR firms, and is provided with consumer electronics devices on loan from hardware manufacturers and/or PR firms respectively for the purposes of evaluating the products and its content for editorial reviews. We receive no compensation from these companies for our opinions or for the writing of reviews or editorials.
Permission is sometimes granted to companies to quote our work and editorial reviews free of charge. Our website may contain affiliate marketing links, which means we may get paid commission on sales of those products or the services we write about. Our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Latest Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

The Irishman (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Martin Scorsese's Academy Award-nominated (Best Director) late career crime world epic gets the Criterion Collection treatment it deserves.

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Criterion gives us a brilliant new 4K restoration on Blu-ray of Jim Jarmusch's 1999's indie classic about a loner assassin who follows the way of the samurai.
%d bloggers like this: