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Wild Target Blu-ray Review

  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Video Codec: AVC/MPEG-4
  • Resolution: 1080p/24
  • Audio Codec: English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Region: A (Region-Locked)
  • Discs: 1
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • Blu-ray Release Date: February 8, 2011
  • List Price: $29.99

[amazon-product align=”right”]B004H4AD1Q[/amazon-product]

Purchase Wild Target on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:3/5]
The Film
[Rating:4/5]

Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:0.5/5]

Click thumbnails for high-resolution 1920X1080p screen captures

(Screen captures are lightly compressed with lossy JPEG  thus are meant as a general representation of the content and do not fully reveal the capabilities of the Blu-ray format)

The Film

[Rating:4/5]

I love British comedies and Wild Target is a great example of the offbeat, absurdist comedy that the Brits have been masters at for years. Wild Target plays like a wild mix of A Fish Called Wanda and Grosse Pointe Blank. Bill Nighy of Harry Potter and Love Actually fame plays the lonely and uptight hit man Victor Maynard who is hired to kill a freewheeling small-time crook, Rose, played by the wonderfully charming Emily Blunt, after she overplays her hand and tries to score big by passing off a fake Rembrandt to a black market buyer.

After he botches the hit, Victor ends up saving Rose from a new set of killers and agrees to become her bodyguard. Along with a bystander, Tony (Rupert Grint), who is dragged into the whole ordeal by being in the wrong place at the wrong time, Victor and Rose go on the run, hiding out from a new, dangerous hitman hired to kill Rose. Eventually Tony becomes Victors apprentice and romance between Victor and Rose ensues.

It’s all great fun with lots of laughs and an unlikely yet undeniable chemistry between Nigh and Blunt. Nigh’s straight-man performance and Blunt’s sexy fun-loving Rose are irresistible, as is some welcome comic relief offered up by the Rupert Grint whose Tony always seems to fall backwards into being the perfect hitman’s apprentice.

Video Quality

[Rating:4/5]

Wild Target looks as good as you’d expect a brand-new comedy to look. The AVC/MPEG-4 1080p encoding is clean, has great detail extension, and a very fine grain structure that imparts just the right amount of filmic quality. The flesh tones are spot on, blacks are nice and deep and colors are bright and consistent.

Audio Quality

[Rating:3.5/5]

The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 lossless mix is perfectly fine for a comedy and about what one would expect. There’s not much activity and it is front-heavy, but the dialogue is clean and sound effects like gunshots and car engines sound weighty with smooth high frequencies.

Supplemental Materials

[Rating:0.5/5]

There’s only one supplement offered up on this barebones release and that is On Target with Emily Blunt (1.33:1; 480i/60; 0:03.33), in which the actress speaks about her role in the film.

The Definitive Word

Overall:

[Rating:3/5]

Wild Target is an excellent, well thought out comedy filled with action, a cute romance, and real belly laughs. I’m happy to have this Blu-ray in my collection and you should be as well.

Additional Screen Captures:

[amazon-product align=”right”]B004H4AD1Q[/amazon-product]

Purchase Wild Target on Blu-ray at CD Universe

Shop for more Blu-ray titles at Amazon.com

Overall
[Rating:3/5]
The Film
[Rating:4/5]

Video Quality
[Rating:4/5]
Audio Quality
[Rating:3.5/5]
Supplemental Materials
[Rating:0.5/5]


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