7.7 C
New York
Wednesday, November 25, 2020
Advertisement

River (TheaterByte Movie Review)

river-2015-poster-post-insertWhat could be worse than being trapped in a foreign country, pursued by the police for a murder that you don’t remember committing, and having no exit strategy? Apparently not much, if we can take Jamie M. Dagg’s recently released River as an object lesson in how trying to be a Good Samaritan can get you into serious trouble.

Young American volunteer doctor, John Lake (Rossif Sutherland) is working hard to save lives in a remote Laotian village hospital. Medical director, Dr. Stephanie Novella (Sara Botsford), sees that Lake is getting burned out, and recommends that the good doctor should get some down time. Dr. Lake arrives at the Mekong river town of Don Khon, and, after knocking back a few brews at the local tavern, he spots a pair of Aussies Simon (David Soncin) and Lachlan (Aidan Gillett) trying to liquor up two local women. Some unspecified time later, a less-than-sober Lake returns to his hotel room with a bruised and bloodied face. As the doctor struggles to remember the evening’s earlier events, he recalls getting punched by Lachlan who was raping one of the women from the bar, Nang (Amphaiphun Phommapunya). Dr. Lake then goes postal and beats the Aussie into a stupor. The next day, Lachlan’s corpse washes up on the riverbank and Lake becomes the prime suspect in his death. A highly suspenseful cat-and-mouse game between Lake and the Laotian authorities now shifts into high gear.

With the plot’s high-velocity twists and turns, we see Dr. Lake using all methods of conveyance, boats, buses, cars, and even his own two feet to elude the dogged pursuit of the police. As if things could not get any worse, Lake finds that the United States Embassy may be unable to prevent his arrest and possible imprisonment. But things do get even worse for Dr. Lake when the dead man was identified as the son of a prominent Australian politician. Douangmany (Douangmany Soliphanh), a man whose son Lake had saved, takes him to the best spot to cross the broad expanse of the Mekong River and escape into Thailand.

[youtube httpss://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqnnuMcblSg&w=640&h=360]

Filmed on location in Laos and Thailand, River is a raw, often chilling account of one man’s struggle against all the odds to avoid prison in a far distant country. First-time director Dagg received the Canadian Cinema Academy’s Claude Jutra Award intended specifically for rookie filmmakers. As noted by Martin Katz, the Academy’s chair, “Jamie M. Dagg’s command of the complex moral story and landscape in River surpasses what we normally see from debutant directors.” Lead actor Rossif Sutherland is a son of the doyen of Canadian actors, Donald Sutherland. The younger Sutherland turns in a tour de force performance, capturing the shifting emotions of an obviously dedicated and principled healer caught up in an unprecedented situation not of his own making. While I expected something more like Midnight Express, River, when compared to the earlier film’s abject brutality, is a dexterous handling of troubling societal issues that still exist in many countries. River can currently be seen on various streaming and VOD outlets.

VUDU:
icon
icon

River (TheaterByte Movie Review)
4 / 5 TheaterByte Rating
{{ reviewsOverall }} / 5 Users (0 votes)
REDLABdigital/Well Go USA EntertainmentStudios & Distributors
PG-13 (language, some sexuality, and violence)Rating Certificate
CanadaCountry
EnglishLanguage
87 MinutesRun Time
2.35:1Aspect Ratio
Jamie M. DaggDirector
Jamie M. DaggWriter
24 June 2016Release Date
The Film
Summary
River is a raw, often chilling account of one man's struggle against all odds.
What people say... Login to rate
Order by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

This review has no replies yet.

Avatar
Show more
Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}

Advertisement

Related Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Stay Connected

300FansLike
0FollowersFollow
723FollowersFollow
- Advertisement -

Notice of Compliance with FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 255

In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR part 255 guidelines, this website hereby states that it receives free discs and other theatrical or home entertainment “screeners” and access to screening links from studios and/or PR firms, and is provided with consumer electronics devices on loan from hardware manufacturers and/or PR firms respectively for the purposes of evaluating the products and its content for editorial reviews. We receive no compensation from these companies for our opinions or for the writing of reviews or editorials.
Permission is sometimes granted to companies to quote our work and editorial reviews free of charge. Our website may contain affiliate marketing links, which means we may get paid commission on sales of those products or the services we write about. Our editorial content is not influenced by advertisers or affiliate partnerships. This disclosure is provided in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR § 255.5: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Latest Articles

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (Blu-ray Review)

This is an uneven but still fun to watch sequel to the 2016 smash hit zombie/action movie lands on Blu-ray with a rollicking Atmos mix.

Chernobyl (4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Review)

The account of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Ukraine, Soviet Union, and the subsequent health and political fallout is told in five gripping episodes.

2067 (Blu-ray Review)

With the world deforested and people dying from a deadly disease caused by synthetic oxygen, a quiet tunnel worker receives a message from the future and must save humanity in this uneven but watchable dystopian Aussie indie sci-fi thriller.

The Irishman (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Martin Scorsese's Academy Award-nominated (Best Director) late career crime world epic gets the Criterion Collection treatment it deserves.

Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Criterion Collection) (Blu-ray Review)

Criterion gives us a brilliant new 4K restoration on Blu-ray of Jim Jarmusch's 1999's indie classic about a loner assassin who follows the way of the samurai.
%d bloggers like this: